Data on the long-term development in the North Atlantic population of the Sandwich Tern, Sterna sandvicensis

Nature Reserve De Beer Communication Series 25

Deze publicatie is vanwege het internationale karakter ervan bij hoge uitzondering in het Engels

 

[31 okt 2020]

Abstract

This publication describes the results of a study into the numbers of breeding pairs of the Sandwich Tern, Sterna sandvicensis, in the North Atlantic population. The data was taken from publications and obtained from colleagues and ornithologists in Belgium, Estonia, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. For the period 1991-2020 the numbers of the entire population fluctuate with deviations of up to 15% around an average of approximately 52,000. These fluctuations can be even greater for individual countries, i.e. up to 50%. This phenomenological research has laid the foundation for future research for which a number of topics have been proposed.

Keywords

Sandwich Tern, Sterna sandvicensis, beccapesci, Brandseeschwalbe, grote stern, Kentsk tärna, rybitwy czubatej, splitterne, sterne caugek, tutt-tiir, North Atlantic population, trend.

 

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Data on the long-term development in the North Atlantic population of the Sandwich Tern, Sterna sandvicensis, Nature Reserve De Beer Communication Series 25, 35 pp., 2020,
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Number of breeding pairs of the Sandwich Tern (Sterna sandvicensis) in the North Atlantic population, 1991-2018

Number of breeding pairs of the Sandwich Tern (Sterna sandvicensis) in the North Atlantic population, 1991-2018. Figure 14 form the publication.

Colonies of the Sandwich Tern (Sterna sandvicensis) in the North Atlantic population in the period 1991 – 2020. Only colonies with more than 100 breeding pairs are shown on the map

Colonies of the Sandwich Tern (Sterna sandvicensis) in the North Atlantic population in the period 1991 – 2020. Only colonies with more than 100 breeding pairs are shown on the map. Not all locations have been occupied during the entire period. The number of breeding pairs in the colonies may have varied strongly over time. Figure 17 from the publication.